Scholla: Father Marx June 2, 1941

Scholla: Father Marx June 2, 1941

Father Marx was a well known character in the neighborhood of Kutztown many years ago. He was a drummer in Washington’s Army during the Revolutionary War. The old veteran loved to play the drum on battalion days in the Maxatawny section. It reminded him of his days with the Continental Army. In 1825 it happened that  the old veteran played his own funeral march. A Maxatawny battalion company was drilling and the old man was wielding his drum sticks when suddenly he fell dead. The same drum which he had carried while he served with Washington was suspended from his shoulder when he fell.

Guck Emohol Baltzer!

Soon after the Battle of Antietam the Army of the Potomac marched into Warrington, Va. This was the seat of many aristocratic families of the old South and many of its citizens belonged to the exclusive order of the First Families of Virginia. While the conquering  Federal troops marched through the village a group of young blue-blood ladies gathered on the steps of a porch and jeered at the passing soldiers, calling them vile names.

The Sixth Regiment of Pennsylvania Reserves was commanded by Colonel Endt. When the dough colonel heard the taunts he muttered, “Just wait until Company A passes this spot. Then Nelson Brunner will silence those females.” When company A swung past the porch on which the tormentor stood Nelson Brunner heard the insults of the unfair one. Instantly he called to a comrade: “Oh! See there Baltzer, what dirty stockings one of the girls has on.” A dozen pairs of eyes dropped footward and a dozen ladies scurried to shelter. In this way Nelson Brunner, a Pennsylvania Dutchman, had silenced this female confederate battery.

Scholla Father Marxx. Reading Times. June  2, 1941. Leroy Gensler
Scholla Father Marxx. Reading Times. June 2, 1941. Leroy Gensler

Scholla drum

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