Casseroles, Jell-O Salad & Other Treats from 1968

Steph Pyrex Dish.jpg

The perfect dish for a perfect casserole! The Pyrex casserole dish pictured above was passed down to Archivist, Stephanie Mihalik from her grandmother. The red and yellow floral and bird motif is called the “Friendship” pattern and was available from 1971 to 1974. Stephanie mostly collects the “Amish Butterprint” or “Golden Butterfly” pattern, but she was happy to inherit this family heirloom into her Pyrex collection.
Casseroles are still part of our everyday American cuisine. However, these “one pot meals” were wildly popular in the 1960s and 70s. “The Hungry Doctor” was written by the Woman’s Auxillary to the Berks County Medical Society, Pennsylvania and was published in 1968. In this vintage cookbook from the Berks History Center Research Library collection, we found a number of casserole recipes including: Hot Chicken Salad, Noodle Pudding a la Crystal, Shrimp ‘n’ Noodles, and Swedish Hamburger Casserole.

 

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WRAW’s Fabulous Forty

 

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Today, local radio station WRAW, channel 1340 AM, is a Spanish language station that specializes in a range of modern Latin American music. This new format reflects recent demographic changes to the Reading area.

Back in the 1960s, WRAW sounded much different. The station broadcasted in English and played a broad selection of the popular music of the day. What were the popular songs in August? The Berks History Center library houses an extensive series of weekly top forty lists played by the station.

In August of 1963 Dean Martin’s ballad “Everybody Loves Somebody” was the number one song. In 1966, Napoleon XIV’s psychedelic “They’re Coming to Take Me Away” occupied the top spot. Cream’s rocker “Sunshine of Your Love” hit number one in WRAW’s Fabulous Forty on August 11, 1968. In the last year of the century, “Soul Deep” by the Box Tops went top. It is clear that from ballads to energetic rock, these end of summer playlists reflected the changing musical landscape of the 1960s. 

Written by guest blogger, Sean Anderson as part of a project funded by the National Endowment for Humanities entitled: Metadata, Marketing, and a Local Archive: Creating Popular Interest from Archival Sources at the Berks History Center Research Library.