Hidden in Heidelberg: The Wernersville Train Station

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Trains have held a certain magic for many people. Train stations, too, for their arrivals and departures to new, exciting places. All of this nostalgia can be seen and savored at the restored historic Wernersville Train station.

Built in 1927, to replace an earlier station, the little used and dilapidated granite and limestone building was rescued and restored by the Heidelberg Heritage Society.  The restoration is authentic; fortunately, the Society was able to secure such items as the original water fountain, Men’s and Ladies’ room signs, and mail wagon.

The first train of the Lebanon Valley Railroad of the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad ran from Reading to Lebanon in 1857; the first passenger train from Reading to Harrisburg in 1858. The establishment of this busy railroad ushered in the successful development of Wernersville and the south mountain resorts.  By 1941, passenger trains were making 26 stops a day!

With the ascendency of the automobile, train travel declined and passenger railroad service at the Wernersville Station terminated in June 1963. What we have now is a beautifully restored train station that brings back all the history and memories of railroading days.

The Wernersville Train Station is one of twelve historic sites on the 2018 4 Centuries in Berks Historic Property Tour, which will explore the architectural treasures of Heidelberg Townships including South Mountain Resort area, Robesonia Furnace Historic District, and Charming Forge Mansion, Boarding House & Village.

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Lebanon Valley Railroad Bridge by John Heyl Raser

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Reading and Berks County have a rich railroad history. This circa 1875 oil painting by John Heyl Raser (1824-1901) depicts the original Lebanon Valley Railroad bridge where it crossed the Schuylkill River and the Union Canal at Reading. Opening in 1858, the Lebanon Valley Railroad became a subsidiary of the Reading Railroad, and a lucrative route connecting Reading with Harrisburg. John Heyl Raser was a native of Alabama who moved to Reading in 1851 and became particularly well known for his landscape paintings. He exhibited his works at a variety of venues including the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts.

Are you a fan of railroad history? Berks History Center’s Second Saturday program on April 8th will focus on the Northern Central Railway and its role in the Civil War. Join us for Scott Mingus Sr.’s talk, Soldiers, Steam & Spies: The Northern Central Railway in the Civil War